"I think about dying but I dont want to die. Not even close. In fact my problem is the complete opposite. I want to live, I want to escape. I feel trapped and bored and claustrophobic. There’s so much to see and so much to do but I somehow still find myself doing nothing at all. I’m still here in this metaphorical bubble of existence and I can’t quite figure out what the hell I’m doing or how to get out of it."

Matty Healy (via tapwaterfanclub)

I love him wow

(via punchdrunklove)

(Source: fallingforthematty, via boss-man-bing)

Zev Explains How to Measure Yourself

binders101:

Hello, dear readers. We’ve gotten a lot of questions lately and always that basically say, “This is my bra size, what size binder should I get?”

Guys, we can’t do everything for you. Even if we were willing to tell all 251 of you exactly what size binder to get (which we aren’t), your bra size is actually not enough information. 

We are here to give you the information that you need to answer these questions yourself. We can’t tell you what binder to get, but we can give you the plusses and minuses of different models so that you’re informed enough to decide yourself.

And because that is what we do, I am going to explain, very clearly, how to find and use the size charts at underworks, t-kingdom, lesloveboat, esha, and peecockproducts. 

Let’s go.

1. Underworks: Their instructions for measuring are on this page: http://ftm.underworks.com/ but I’ll explain it for you anyway.

  • get one of those cloth measuring tapes. If you only have a yardstick or a crunchy carpentry measuring tape, get a long piece of string to wrap around yourself and then measure the string.
  • measure the top of your ribcage, under your “bust.” Measure carefully, keeping the tape straight and flat against you, right in the spot where the band of a bra would go. Keep the tape snug but it shouldn’t be super-tight. You want an accurate measurement.
  • measure the widest part of your chest. This part is different places on different people. Do your best. Be as careful as you were in step 2.
  • Take the average of the two measurements. That means add them together and divide by two. If your first measurement is 30 and your second measurement is 40, the average is 35. 
  • Go, on the underworks site, to the specific binder that you want. You’ll see something that looks like this: ” Size - fits Chest:  x-small 29-31 / Small  32-34 / Medium 35-39 / Large 40-44 / X-large 45-48 / 2X 48-52  / 3X 53-56”  
  • Your average measurement should be within the range of your size. When I measure like this, I get a 37. That means I’m a medium. 
  • Remember that, as it says on the underworks site, “Each item has a different scale based on the elasticity of the fabric used and the cut of the garment, so please pay attention to the sizing scale for each style.” 
  • The Underworks site uses INCHES!

2. Lesloveboat: here are lesloveboat’s instructions for measuring: http://www.lesloveboat.com/shop/sizechart.php?osCsid=1e08af4f24c5c470d3c86d2fd9f2e702 But of course I’ll explain it for you, too, because I’m nice.

  • get one of those cloth measuring tapes. If you only have a yardstick or a crunchy carpentry measuring tape, get a long piece of string to wrap around yourself and then measure the string.
  • Measure the widest part of your chest, snugly and carefully. The widest part is on different places for different people.
  • Go to the specific binder on the lesloveboat site that you want. There’s a drop-down menu for size, pick the size that contains your measurement.
  • If you don’t feel comfortable measuring yourself, the lesloveboat site gives an alternative way of finding your measurement using your bra size. Scroll down on the sizing page that I linked to the section called “measuring from your bra size.” There’s a table of band sizes and a table of cup sizes. Simply add the number of centimeters given for your band size to the number of centimeters given for your cup size, and that’s your measurement. I don’t recommend this method. I don’t recommend it because bra sizing is inconsistent, because many people wear the wrong bra size, and because a tape measure never lies.
  • for god’s sake, remember that the lesloveboat site uses CENTIMETERS.

3. t-kingdom Here’s your link to the size chart: http://www.t-kingdom.com/shopping/english/size.htm And this one is actually so convoluted that I don’t mind explaining it to you.

  • get one of those cloth measuring tapes. If you only have a yardstick or a crunchy carpentry measuring tape, get a long piece of string to wrap around yourself and then measure the string.
  • Measure the widest part of your chest, following the rules of carefulness as specified above. The t-kingdom site says to measure “over your nipples” but I think that they’re assuming perkiness, which isn’t fair to the fact that there are many kinds of bodies.
  • Scroll down on the size chart page.
  • Find a row on the column that is true to your height, weight, and chest size. 
  • But here’s the thing: your height and weight don’t actually matter- all the mediums are for chests 31-33 inches, all the larges are for 34-36. So just find a row on the column that’s true to the width of your chest.
  • T-kingdom is super nice and uses centimeters AND inches. So just know which one you’re using. Don’t measure in centimeters and then try to use the size chart in inches. That’d be dumb.

4. Esha So, on the esha site, if you click on “size chart” in the left sidebar, it brings you here: http://www.esha-taipei.net/en/?artlist-137.html This is a list of the binders available at esha. Once you’ve perused the site to pick the model you want, click on that model and follow the sizing on that site.

Now, there are no instructions on this site for measuring, just a table with a list of “chest width,” along with height and weight. I’m going to assume that this means you should measure the widest part of your chest. I’m assuming this because it matches up with weight better (obviously that’s a big assumption) and because the standard measuring systems for lesloveboat and t-kingdom seem to stick to a single measurement, whereas US-based companies use two measurements. 

5. Peecockproducts: The size chart is here: http://www.peecockproducts.com/images/uploads/Binder/sizing_chart_400x600_updnov2010.jpg and quite seriously looks like it was lifted straight off of the t-kingdom site. The sizes vary slightly from those of the t-kingdom site but the self-measuring is so similar that I encourage you, if getting a peecock binder, to scroll up to part three and follow those instructions.

6. sohoeva: 

  • Every binder at this site has a different size chart. Pick the binder you want, then click on the size chart. You’ll find the button to get to the chart down near the bottom of the page, where there are other pictures of the binder for you to click on and enlarge. One of those pictures is the size chart.
  • Got your size chart? Good. Follow the instructions that I gave you for the lesloveboat site. Match your chest size to your size. If you’re on the cusp of two sizes, go for the underbust size that matches. If you’re still on the cusp, match by weight.
  • remember: centimeters and kilograms!

~~

I hope that’s enough information for you to find out for yourself. I know that measuring yourself sucks. It can cause dysphoria and it can be confusing, but you need to do it if you want a binder that fits. The suckiness now will pay off in the long run. You’ll be safe, and comfortable and have a great binder. 

If there are any other sites you’d like us to include in this how-to guide, let us know and we’ll add them. I hope that we’ll keep this post updated to fit any changes in sizing at various sites so that people can continually link back to it.

Stay excellent,

Zev

Anonymous said: Tbh honest I'm looking for a porn vid of a transman with bottom surgery Do you know of any? I wanna know how it work in action lol And if there's like extra parts where you have to pump it and if it gets in the way and ruins the mood

ftmsextalk:

By bottom surgery you mean phalloplasty. This needs to be specified as there are two main forms of bottom surgery and several sub-categories that fall under those two main forms.

From an earlier post:

"Xtube has some awesome videos of men who have had Phalloplasty jacking off, peeing, pumping up their balls to get hard, getting BJs and having sex! Here are some awesome links for you!

If you know of anymore links, please send them to me and I will add them to this!”

The pump is placed where a testicular implant would be, so you pump it up through the scrotal sac. There’s nothing extra and nothing getting in the way.

- Skylar

hobbitkaiju:

ftmporn:

mkwftm:

5 months on testosterone.  This is my last photo update before I leave for Ghana for 2-3 (or more) months.  Pre-T weight: 114lbs. 5 month on T weight: 135lbs.  It will be interesting to see the changes over the summer!

Thanks again, Tyler, I appreciate you documenting my journey. 

Love fellow trans guys with long hair!

I am pretty sure this guy is too hot to actually exist

also yes, more trans guys with long hair like me <3333

(via nokispirations)

ftminjection:

FTM INJECTION TUTORIAL. Everyone is taught how to perform an IM injection by many physicians and how to perform them on many areas of the body. This is what works for me and it’s helped many. Step by step I will walk you through an IM injection.

(Source: , via journeytotheskye)

Some tips for lowering your voice I’ve picked up over the years

transmedicalistunruhe:

  • Keep your throat sufficiently lubed with water at all times.
  • Practice humming as low as you can. Attempt to give the hum some vibrato by fluttering your diaphragm (it’s about where the bottom of your rib cage meets the rest of your abdomen; put your hand there while breathing and notice how it moves. You can easily make it flutter or halt).
  • When practicing dropping your voice, put your hand on your throat. You’ll notice that it vibrates. Now put your hand on your chest, about on the same line as your heart. Try to shift the vibration down to there. 
  • When first starting out, speak a bit quieter than you normally do until you get the hang of things.
  • Listen to Johnny Cash and croon along.
  • If you get hoarse or something starts to hurt, stop what you’re doing.

(via anonimotrans)

jesse-lamps:

This is a great reference for FTM’s looking into different types of top surgery.

All credit goes to TopSurgery.net

(via iftheresawill)

(Source: little--perfect-world, via daggerjaw)

(Source: d-y-s-p-h-o-r-i-c, via journeytotheskye)

casperisaghost said: hey guys- do either of you know if pumping your dick to make it larger is actually effective or not? does it just make it bigger for a while afterwards or does it have lasting effects? I'm curious to know if i should invest in a pump or not in the future :) thanks!

journeytotheskye:

ftmsextalk:

Hey! I (Chase) am actually looking into a not-so-expensive pump to test it out! I’ve heard some people LOVING it and saying that it DID stretch the area a little therefore they did get a little growth! I think it ‘feels’ amazing to have it so long and hard when you pump it, but I do believe it goes down after a while. But like I said, I’m almost sure there is a little stretching and growing that can occur which is exciting!

Another thing to look into is the DHT cream! I’m going to make a detailed video about this soon because I’m FOR SURE going to try to get it! I have a friend who was on it who grow 3/4 inches in 3 months! like HELLO!!!! totally trying this! (also fun fact: I told my therapist this and he misheard me and heard “he grow 3 inches” instead and he was like “3 INCHES????? WHAT!!!” and I was like “oh god no! I said 3/4th!” and he was like “omg ok I was going to say, give me some of that!” haha so funny :D)

yes pumping can help! more effective for some rather than others but yes it does work

Reblog if you did NOT know you were trans at birth.

mecto-arnore:

My mom is still struggling with this whole trans* thing because “You didn’t act like a boy and you didn’t choose boy clothes when you were little”
Personally, I didn’t realize the error of my birth until I was 8 and started the precursors of puberty when I realized I was in the wrong body and wanted to be a boy and have a boy body and look like a boy.
I was too scared of being pegged as even more of a freak to accept this until I turned 13.

(Source: slowverdose, via journeytotheskye)

inmycreativeworld:

I love you for you.

inmycreativeworld:

I love you for you.

(via journeytotheskye)

letryanbesuper:

Fuck my life.. At moments.,…

(via journeytotheskye)

lovingmalemodels:

Stefanos Milatos by Joey Leo

One day, I shall get hair like that.

lovingmalemodels:

Stefanos Milatos by Joey Leo

One day, I shall get hair like that.

(Source: lovingmalemodels)

putthison:

"Does It Fit?" Checklist
A friend of mine recently had to get a new suit for a wedding (not his), and asked for my advice on how to tell if a suit jacket fits. I thought about sending him to the various guides Jesse and I have written on the topic, but realized they might be too much to read for someone who doesn’t have a particular interest in menswear. So I wrote out a very basic checklist – something simple, practical, and easy-to-use for how to evaluate if a suit jacket or sport coat fits, with links to longer articles in case anyone wants to read more. 
The Basics
The guiding principle for how a suit jacket should fit is pretty simple. There should be clean lines all around, with no puckering or pulling anywhere, and the jacket should flatter the body (this doesn’t mean it should be super tight). Looking at photos of our friends Voxsartoria and MostExerent can be instructive. 
More specifically …
Shoulders: The shoulder line should be clean, not lumpy, and the ends of your jacket’s shoulders should generally coincide with the ends of your natural shoulders.
Chest: Most off-the-rack suits are designed so that the jacket’s chest should stay fairly close to your body, but if you see the lapels starting to buckle, that means your jacket is too tight.
Length: If you want something classic, the hem of your jacket should hit roughly midway between your jacket’s collar and the floor.
Collar: The collar should stay glued to your neck, even when you move your arms about (within reason).
Sleeves: Make sure the sleeves fall cleanly. There shouldn’t be any divots or wrinkles when you hang your arms naturally by your side.
Sleeve length: Few jackets will have a perfect sleeve length off-the-rack, so most will need to be altered. Just make sure that after alterations, you have about a half inch of shirt cuff peeking out. Unfortunately, this can sometimes be made difficult by what’s called “working buttonholes.”
Waist: There’s some wiggle room here. You can have the waist nipped to give the jacket more shape, or let out if it feels too tight. In the end, just make sure the jacket isn’t pulling at the buttoning point. 
Other Details
After that, there are some other details you might want to pay attention to:
Quarters: This is the colloquial name for the area of your jacket below the buttoning point. Think about whether you like this area closed or open. It can make a big difference in how your jacket looks. 
Buttoning point: On a three-button jacket, button the middle button, and on a two-button jacket, button the top. Notice where this point sits. Ideally, it should be at your natural waist, though fashion designers have been placing it higher and higher. Be aware that an overly high buttoning point can make you look heavier than you are.
Lapels: Skinny lapels have been en vogue for a few years now (thanks to Mad Men), but are possibly on their way out. I presume the next fad will be wide lapels at some point. For something classic, stick to something that ends half way between your collar and shoulder point.
Notch: Pay attention to where the notches are placed on your lapel. It’s been fashionable to have them very high up on the body, sometimes almost near the top of the shoulders, but like low notches in the 1980s, these will probably go out of fashion at some point. Be wary of extremes. 
Balance: When looking at the jacket from the side, the front and back hem should even with each other, or the front should be slightly longer than the back. When viewed from the front, the left and right sides should generally be even. This is called balance. Truthfully, unless you’re getting something bespoke (and even then, this doesn’t always work out), the second part is rare to achieve. If you have a very dropped shoulder, this can affect how the buttons and buttonholes align, which can then throw off how the jacket looks when buttoned.
The second section above is admittedly a bit nit-picky, but it points to some good things to pay attention to when evaluating how a jacket looks on you. Fortunately, there are some workarounds if you see something you don’t like. If the quarters are too closed, or if the buttoning point is too high, you can always just wear the jacket unbuttoned. And if the balance is a bit off, you can ask an alterations tailor to move the buttons up a bit so that they align with the buttonholes. Finding the perfect jacket can be difficult, so how much you care about getting the perfect fit will greatly depend on how much time and money you want to spend. But at least now you know what to look for. 

Whoa, important information! I regularly buy clothes off the rack so I really should hold on to this the next time I get anything altered.

putthison:

"Does It Fit?" Checklist

A friend of mine recently had to get a new suit for a wedding (not his), and asked for my advice on how to tell if a suit jacket fits. I thought about sending him to the various guides Jesse and I have written on the topic, but realized they might be too much to read for someone who doesn’t have a particular interest in menswear. So I wrote out a very basic checklist – something simple, practical, and easy-to-use for how to evaluate if a suit jacket or sport coat fits, with links to longer articles in case anyone wants to read more.

The Basics

The guiding principle for how a suit jacket should fit is pretty simple. There should be clean lines all around, with no puckering or pulling anywhere, and the jacket should flatter the body (this doesn’t mean it should be super tight). Looking at photos of our friends Voxsartoria and MostExerent can be instructive.

More specifically …

  • Shoulders: The shoulder line should be clean, not lumpy, and the ends of your jacket’s shoulders should generally coincide with the ends of your natural shoulders.
  • Chest: Most off-the-rack suits are designed so that the jacket’s chest should stay fairly close to your body, but if you see the lapels starting to buckle, that means your jacket is too tight.
  • Length: If you want something classic, the hem of your jacket should hit roughly midway between your jacket’s collar and the floor.
  • Collar: The collar should stay glued to your neck, even when you move your arms about (within reason).
  • Sleeves: Make sure the sleeves fall cleanly. There shouldn’t be any divots or wrinkles when you hang your arms naturally by your side.
  • Sleeve length: Few jackets will have a perfect sleeve length off-the-rack, so most will need to be altered. Just make sure that after alterations, you have about a half inch of shirt cuff peeking out. Unfortunately, this can sometimes be made difficult by what’s called “working buttonholes.”
  • Waist: There’s some wiggle room here. You can have the waist nipped to give the jacket more shape, or let out if it feels too tight. In the end, just make sure the jacket isn’t pulling at the buttoning point

Other Details

After that, there are some other details you might want to pay attention to:

  • Quarters: This is the colloquial name for the area of your jacket below the buttoning point. Think about whether you like this area closed or open. It can make a big difference in how your jacket looks. 
  • Buttoning point: On a three-button jacket, button the middle button, and on a two-button jacket, button the top. Notice where this point sits. Ideally, it should be at your natural waist, though fashion designers have been placing it higher and higher. Be aware that an overly high buttoning point can make you look heavier than you are.
  • Lapels: Skinny lapels have been en vogue for a few years now (thanks to Mad Men), but are possibly on their way out. I presume the next fad will be wide lapels at some point. For something classic, stick to something that ends half way between your collar and shoulder point.
  • Notch: Pay attention to where the notches are placed on your lapel. It’s been fashionable to have them very high up on the body, sometimes almost near the top of the shoulders, but like low notches in the 1980s, these will probably go out of fashion at some point. Be wary of extremes. 
  • Balance: When looking at the jacket from the side, the front and back hem should even with each other, or the front should be slightly longer than the back. When viewed from the front, the left and right sides should generally be even. This is called balance. Truthfully, unless you’re getting something bespoke (and even then, this doesn’t always work out), the second part is rare to achieve. If you have a very dropped shoulder, this can affect how the buttons and buttonholes align, which can then throw off how the jacket looks when buttoned.

The second section above is admittedly a bit nit-picky, but it points to some good things to pay attention to when evaluating how a jacket looks on you. Fortunately, there are some workarounds if you see something you don’t like. If the quarters are too closed, or if the buttoning point is too high, you can always just wear the jacket unbuttoned. And if the balance is a bit off, you can ask an alterations tailor to move the buttons up a bit so that they align with the buttonholes. Finding the perfect jacket can be difficult, so how much you care about getting the perfect fit will greatly depend on how much time and money you want to spend. But at least now you know what to look for.

Whoa, important information! I regularly buy clothes off the rack so I really should hold on to this the next time I get anything altered.